Oreo Thins: A Pinkie-Raising Classy Cookie?

Oreo is pushing its new Thins brand with a campaign suggesting a more grown-up cookie.

An Ode to the Forgotten Finger” – Oreo’s new 60-second video spot – starts as a playfully humorous examination of each finger’s role, before lamenting the lack of usefulness for the pinkie. Thankfully, Oreo Thins are here to give the pinkie something to do.

Oreo Thins: A Pinkie-Raising Classy Cookie?

The pinkie’s life-changing new role? Standing high in the air with pride as its owner eats a new Oreo Thins cookie. The video – produced by 360i, Oreo’s digital marketing team – is narrated by the pinkie itself, which is grateful to finally have importance.

One minor issue I have with this spot is that the pinkie still isn’t doing anything. It is literally the only finger not being used to hold the cookie at the end of the spot. Isn’t that what the narration was complaining about all along?

In all seriousness, I get the idea that Oreo Thins are an attempt to break into a demographic that has outgrown traditional Oreos. On paper, the idea of presenting them as a high-society cookie – in a tongue-in-cheek fashion – is a good one.

Still, something about it just feels forced. I personally haven’t eaten an Oreo in years, and the fact that they’re now available in a different shape has in no way triggered cravings for them.

Oreo Thins are simply a gimmick, nothing more. Its sleek shape isn’t going to fool anyone into thinking they’re somehow a healthier snack option than before. You can just eat more of them now. Yippee.

I guess you could say that I’m not a big fan of processed cookie-food at any size.

Do not get me started about Mint Milanos.  They are my weakness.

Howard Davidson Arlington MA

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Oreo Cookie’s Jingle Has Balls

Oreo, the best selling cookie in the United States since its introduction in 1912, now has a jingle with balls.

With more the 362 billion Oreo cookies sold to date, Oreo is taking a ballsy move this holiday season.  The company has partnered with The Martin Agency and rolled out a Wonderfilled jingle celebrating the popular holiday treat, the Oreo cookie ball. This isn’t an actual product of Oreo, but rather a homemade delicacy of crushed up Oreos and cream cheese that are rolled into a ball and covered in chocolate (in case you’re one of the unfortunate few that aren’t familiar). The treat is so popular in fact, that the video makes no point of showing us how to make them. Alas, Oreo cookie balls are already a staple of our holiday cuisine and we need no instruction.

The jingle was recorded by upcoming rap sensation and MTV favorite JINX drops a seasonal rhyme to get you in a cookie ballin state of mind. The catchy tune makes no point of trying to sell us Oreos directly (sure, you might need a few to make the cookie balls), and the homemade treat is widespread enough to need no further push.

Beware; the jingle is a bit addictive.  As you may have heard, Oreos are in fact addictive too.  Connecticut College students and a professor of psychology have found “America’s favorite cookie” is just as addictive as cocaine – at least for lab rats. And just like most humans, rats go for the middle first.

So go ahead, decorate your cookie balls with pretzel antlers or a carrot nose as the video instructs. Meanwhile, good luck with getting it out of your head (and stomachs).

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Oreo Makes Music Wonderfill

Music has always been crucial to advertising, which is why what Oreo is doing now seems so obvious. Their “Wonderfilled” campaign employs the skills of popular musicians Chiddy Bang, Owl City, and Kacey Musgraves by having each record a different version of Oreo’s Wonderfilled jingle, which is then set to a short, word-based, cartoon animation. AdWeek has called the phenomenon the “branded pop song”.   Oreo is really trying to make music wonderfill.

There are likable and dislikable parts about this campaign. One very likable aspect is that fans of these musicians are liable to check-out the new “music” from their artist just because they are fans. That’s an easy +1 for Oreo. Another likable part of Wonderfilled is that the company can expand the campaign as it sees fit, or as it gains popularity. If it catches on, it is an almost infinitely expandable campaign for the near future. Oreo can sign new artists, do more street-marketing campaigns to place on Youtube (like the one they did in New York City), and even go so far to sponsor music festivals or something like that. Oreo even has a “Wonderfilled Studios” on their website, in which popular Youtube artists cover the ad-song as well.

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The dislikable part so far is the original version done by Owl City’s Adam Young – it is insufferable. Like his signature singles, the lyrics and melody are cutesy and bubbly like a lullaby, which may work for Oreo’s image but really takes a toll on the ears. Chiddy’s version, on the other hand, is fresh and witty – “if you want to go and lick it, I believe you should” he declares. If Oreo keeps putting out versions with bite like Chiddy’s, I think I’ll take that lick.

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